During the past month, I have posted 16 items on LinkedIn and received 139 Likes, 18 Comments and 4200 Views. That is an average of 8 Likes per item, 1 Comment per item and 263 views per item. Now considering that LinkedIn has 260 million active users, just on views alone, I am only receiving 0,01% interactions. I know, definitely not something to brag about or by any means a reason to bring out the bubbly and throw a party.

Before you think that this is a way of soliciting more comments, likes and views, let me set the record straight. If that was my goal, I wouldn’t have written an article – posts and videos are much more popular and would drive my numbers up.

The actual reason I am being open about these statistics is because I want to encourage those of you who may feel that despite the effort and time you are putting into your articles, videos or posts, you are not getting the desired outcome. I also want to highlight that everything you do, create or launch has two possible outcomes – maybe it will work, maybe it won’t. When you write an article, put together a programme, start a project or launch a new product you are always faced with both of these possibilities. The trick to being successful at anything is to accept these two likelihoods and proceed anyway – write that article, put that product out there or approach that client.

Another very important step to take in your creative process is to decide how you will measure your success. I recently started a 6-week personal growth journey video series which I shared on my various social platforms and the first question I was asked by colleagues and friends after I launched the first video was: Are people actually participating? People were surprised when I told them, besides the group of people who have contacted me directly, I have no idea. I had determined that I would measure my success by only one thing: ensuring that I create informative videos (in my view) and put them up every Monday before 07:00 on my social platforms. If I can do this for the next 6 weeks consistently, I have been successful.

So the next time you are wondering whether you should put something out there remember that you are creating something because you can. Try to resist the urge to make your likes, shares and views a measure of your success.

Thoughts that may help you to get your magic out there 

  1. There will be people that don’t like your idea, they may disagree with your views and they may not buy your product. This is their choice. You are not creating for them. You are creating for you and those people that are interested and will support your idea. If you don’t get the necessary buy-in, develop your idea further, create something better and simply get it out there.
  2. Successful artists can afford great tools but they didn’t start off with state of the art equipment. Famous books have been written on exam pads and typed up on old typewriters.
  3. Motivation is for amateurs. Professionals get on with the business of getting on. Your feelings have nothing to do with your ability to create. If you want to write, get up set a time limit and write.

Please do get your work out there and share your ideas – it’s time to make your mark and as a fellow inhabitant on this earth, I am counting on you to live your purpose because it will make a difference to someone.

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